Adoption Story

Child Book on Adoption

Telling Children about New Baby Birth & Sibling Adoption Stories

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Our adoption story titles listed below are in our order of preference to read to children beginning with our favoites! When you look for a child book on adoption, you will find a variety ranging from addressing issues of belonging, some with real photos and others with animals. Most of our favorite child books on adoption had animals in them... take a look below.
rosie's family adoption story
Softcover

Rosie's Family:
An Adoption Story

by Lori Rosove

Child Book on Adoption
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Rosie's Family is an adoption story about belonging in a family regardless of differences. Rosie is a beagle who was adopted by schnauzers. She feels different from the rest of her family and sets forth many questions that children who were adopted may have.
This adoption story also has tips for parents in the back.


oliver adoption story
Hardcover

Oliver:
A Story About Adoption

By Lois Wickstrom

Child Book on Adoption
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Adoption Story review From School Library Journal
In this adoption story, Oliver wishes he had a totally different life after receiving a gentle reprimand from his adoptive father. Sent to his room, the young lizardlike creature is convinced that his birth parents would have cut him a much better deal. A little later his mother and father share their own childhood fantasies with him. Most children, explains his father, imagine the lives they could be having, especially when they are angry with their parents. Thus enlightened, Oliver decides to stay put. Whimsical black-and-white ink drawings somewhat temper the earnest message of this book. Oliver is not ``a story about adoption'' as the subtitle would have it; it would work just as well if the boy were a biological child. --Anna Biagioni Hart, Martha Washington Library, Alexandria, VA Copyright 1992 Reed Business Information, Inc.


a mother for choco Hardcover
A Mother For Choco: An Adoption Story
By Keiko Kasza


Child Book on Adoption
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Adoption Story review From School Library Journal
Fans of Kasza's previous picture books will welcome this latest effort. Cheerful, energetic illustrations decorate the simple but charming adoption story of a youngster's search for a loving parent.

In this adoption stor, a chubby-faced yellow bird with blue-striped feet, Choco believes that physical similarity is a prerequisite for family relationships. He asks a series of animals who bear even the slightest resemblance to him if they might be his mother, but all turn him away. Discouraged by their rejection, Choco is pleasantly surprised when Mrs. Bear takes an interest in him, plays with and cuddles him, and ultimately offers him a home. The presence of other ``adoptees'' is made obvious as a young alligator, hippopotamus, and pig welcome Choco into his new family.

The endearing watercolor paintings in this adoption story are bold and bright enough to appeal to the very youngest listeners, and there is a wealth of character and personality evident in the animals' expressions. These pictures, along with the minimal, repetitive text, make this an excellent choice for storytime use. The emphasis on caring and sharing despite superficial differences will surely find a wide audience. A multicultural message may also be read into this satisfying adoption story with appealing illustrations and a very happy ending. --Lisa Dennis, The Carnegie Library of Pittsburgh Copyright 1992 Reed Business Information, Inc.


horace adoption story
Hardcover

Nikolai, The Only Bear
An Adoption Story

By Barbara Joosse

Child Book on Adoption
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Adoption Story review From School Library Journal
In this adoptin story, Nikolai, the sole bear in a Russian orphanage, doesn't fit in. Because he growls rather than talks and doesn't always "play nice," he has remained in the institution for three years. An American couple, in search of a youngster to love, visits the children's home and becomes acquainted with the cub. The bearded man has the ability to communicate in Bearspeak, while his wife makes Nikolai feel "soft-bearish" inside. All ends happily when the three leave Russia to become a family in the States. Pale tan, brown, and green dominate the soft-hued paintings, and the adults and children are all short with round heads and triangular noses. Read this well-written, attractively laid out bookalong with Eliza Thomas's The Red Blanket (Scholastic, 2004) for tales of cross-cultural adoptions. Maryann H. Owen, Racine Public Library, WI Copyright Reed Business Information, a division of Reed Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.


horace adoption story
Hardcover

Horace:
An Adoption Story

By Holly Keller

Child Book on Adoption
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Adoption Story review From Publishers Weekly
In this adoption story, Horace is spotted. He is loved and cared for by his new mother and father--who are striped. But, as is frequently the case with adopted children who are "different" ("My spots are silly. . . and I'm all the wrong colors"), Horace feels the need to search out his roots. And although he does find a brood that resembles him physically, it is not a family that truly loves him. Once again, Keller ( Goodbye, Max ; Henry's Happy Birthday ) deals with a sensitive subject in a way that is perceptive but not sentimental. Her text is suitably straightforward: "We liked your spots, and we wanted you to be our child," says Mama in her customary bedtime story. The bright, boldly colored illustrations feature a lively animal cast and numerous amusing details, such as cat's-paw slippers beside Horace's bed. Youngsters will love Horace as they absorb his subtle message; even parents may find a small lump in their throats. Ages 4-up. Copyright 1991 Reed Business Information, Inc.


horace adoption story
Hardcover

Our Twitchy
An Adoption Story

By Kes Gray and mary McQuillan

Child Book on Adoption
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Adoption Story review From School Library Journal
Twitchy the rabbit asks his parents why they don't hop like he does. They explain that even though they live in a burrow (an old train tunnel) and eat carrots (to help them see in the dark), they aren't his Bunnymom and Bunnypop. Twitchy's adopted mother is a cow, and his adopted father is a horse. The youngster is so upset when he hears this that he runs away from home. Milfoil and Sedge search everywhere but then head for home with heavy hearts. When they hear a voice, they gallop to the train tunnel to find Twitchy sitting by the entrance, covered in mud with his ears rolled up and secured by clothespins and a twig tied onto his tail. He tells them: "I can change. I promise I can change. I can be a cow or a horse. But please be my real mom and pop." Milfoil and Sedge assure him that they are his parents and love him and that they don't want him to change. Pastel-colored illustrations invoke a feeling of calm and tranquility. This touching story will amuse readers as they, along with Twitchy, discover that being in a family is about love and acceptance. Kristin de Lacoste, South Regional Public Library, Pembroke Pines, FL Copyright Reed Business Information, a division of Reed Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.


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